The Hidden Secrets of a 401k

I want to share with you items to consider before investing in a 401k.  Some of those items are the tax ramifications and the control over your money you will be forfeiting.  Uncle Sam makes the decisions on when you can access your money without penalty, what the penalty is for early withdrawals, the taxes you pay, the required minimum distribution (RMD) amount, when you must begin to take the RMD and more… Watch my short presentation below for more information and view a full expo by both Frontline and 60 Minutes.

IRA’s – What you need to know

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Many have heard of an IRA but do they really know what it is or how the different types work?  An IRA is an Individual Retirement Account.  IRA’s are a way for you to save for retirement; something like a savings account but with limits on deposits, tax deferral, and restrictions & penalties on accessing the funds. Also, an IRA is an account and not an investment. The money is in the account and applied to different investments depending upon your choice of investment. Typical investments are stocks, bonds, mutual funds and/or other assets depending upon the type of IRA you opened.

Here is a breakdown of different IRA’s:

  • Traditional IRA – Generally, you pay taxes on the money (what you put in) when you begin your withdrawals; the money you initially put in is therefore tax deferred. The thought process on this is when you begin your withdrawals (currently mandatory at age 70-1/2 but can start as early as age 59-1/2 penalty free) your income will be less so your tax bracket is lower therefore you will owe less in taxes than if you paid them as you earned the money. With the advent of the 401k many people that leave their employer with a 401k then move the money into a Traditional IRA account.

There are annual limits on how much money you can contribute to a Traditional IRA based upon your income and age. As an example, currently in 2016, if you are under age 50 you contribute $5,500 annually. If you currently contribute through an employer plan consult a tax advisor before contributing to your IRA as it many impact your tax deductions allowed.

You can request an early withdrawal from your account however it will be taxed and you will pay a penalty (currently 10%) if it is requested before age 59-1/2.

  •  Roth IRA – With a Roth IRA you pay the taxes on the money going into the account and then your future withdrawals, including earnings, are tax free. However, the account must be open for at least five (5) years and the distributions begin after age 59-1/2. There are allowances for penalty free withdrawals such as for a first time home buyer.  Also, other withdrawals can be made tax-free; however, you might still have to pay a penalty. Always consult a tax advisor before making a withdrawal.
  • SEP IRA – Generally just referred to as a SEP this is a Simplified Employee Pension IRA. The SEP IRA is used by business owners with one or more employee’s, those that are self-employed or have freelance income for a simplified method to save and contribute to the employee’s and their own retirement. A SEP IRA is opened for each individual and contributions are made to the IRA by the employer. The SEP IRA follows the same rules as a Traditional IRA.
  • SIMPLE IRA – This is also for small business owners/employers and provides a simplified method for them to contribute to their and their employee’s retirement. SIMPLE stands for Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees. This differs from the SEP IRA. Here employees may chose to make salary reduction contributions and the employer then makes matching or non-elective contributions. Each employee has their own SIMPLE IRA set up and contributions are made directly to that account.
  • Self-Directed IRA – This is similar to the Traditional IRA. However, the big difference is that you have control of the investments.  To open a Self-Directed IRA you must contact one of several companies out there that act as the custodian for your account.  You work through the custodian on where you want the money invested.  There are many more options for investing using this type of IRA.  Some options are real estate, tax lien certificates, precious metals and so much more.  However, there are strict rules on the self-directed IRA so be sure to do your research. For example: No loaning of money to yourself, your spouse or any family member in your direct linear family chain.

If you are interested in knowing more about IRA options you can check out information available on Roth Conversions and a Perpetual Pension that I have available for you.  Also, there are two great videos from Frontline and 60 minutes for you to watch.

Profiting from an IRA Conversion?

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Many Americans have traditional Individual Retirement Accounts, where your annual contributions are reduced from your taxable income, yielding a tax deduction now, but your withdrawals are taxed. And many also have Roth IRAs, where the money you invest is taxed normally in the year you deposit it, but the profits grow tax-deferred and can be withdrawn tax-free after you retire.

The two options raise the obvious question: Would you rather pay tax on the seed money now or the crop of money later? This point has been debated for years, but for this post we are going to assume you would rather pay the known tax now vs. an unknown tax later.

Many people with traditional IRAs also open and fund a Roth IRA. But, if you’d like, you can convert a traditional IRA into a Roth account. Taxes are due on any amount you convert. The benefits of conversion:

As great at these benefits are, a conversion may not be for everyone. The longer you have until the money is needed, the better a move conversion can be. Get advice from a professional, input your data into one of the many software programs designed to calculate the costs and benefits, or email me for a free customized analysis.

Partial Conversions Can Be Powerful

Many people don’t realize that they can convert just a portion of a traditional IRA. If you combine the partial conversion with certain financial products, your tax burden can be lessened dramatically.

Let’s assume you have $400,000 in a traditional IRA and your effective tax rate is 20 percent.

You initiate a partial conversion of $130,841, which would mean you have to pay $26,168 in taxes. This gives you $104,673 for your Roth account and leaves you $269,157 in your traditional IRA.

You could elect to combine the conversion with a rollover into a solid fixed indexed annuity that offered a initial premium bonus. If you roll over your $269,159 traditional IRA into a product that gave you a 7 percent premium bonus and did the same thing with your new Roth account with a balance of $104,673 after taxes, then you would receive a $26,168 bonus that would put your starting balance of your combined IRA accounts back to the original $400,000 before the conversion.

The difference is that now $104,673 is now tax-free and not just tax-deferred. Assuming a modest 5 percent growth rate inside of both accounts, after just 10 years, you would be $43,785 ahead with this strategy than if you just let your traditional IRA stand. In 20 years, you will have over $83,000 more in your combined accounts (even after factoring in the taxes on your traditional IRA) than you would have had without the conversion.

Creating and preserving wealth is much like any other endeavor in which you would like to have success. A good system plus discipline equals more success than just “winging” it in life. This one simple strategy can create tens and even hundreds of thousands of extra dollars in your later years or to leave behind for those you love. If you would like more information on this strategy visit us and request your free report.