4 Wealth Drains Robbing You Blind Each Month

And You Don’t Even Know It

The first and biggest “wealth drain” is taxes.

Our tax system is designed to penalize hourly and salaried workers while rewarding entrepreneurs and business owners. Salaried workers pay taxes based on what they gross, while business owners pay taxes based on what they net. To that end, most people think Fortune 500 companies getting something over on little guys. Keep in mind, you don’t have to be a big business to get great tax advantages. Even startups get huge tax benefits. So rather than complain, maybe you should run a business from your kitchen table

To qualify for tax deductions in that business, the IRS says you must intend to make a profit. When that standard is met, you automatically qualify for dozens of tax deductions that you don’t get as an individual. Most losses and startup expenses can be written off against other income from your job (limits apply, so get a good business CPA to work with you). Realize that nobody else (not even your CPA or tax preparer) cares how much you pay in taxes, so it’s your job to understand how the system work and how to use it effectively.

Losing the Chance at Compound Growth

Another set of huge wealth drains are market losses on investment capital that you control. When a stock or a piece of real estate drops significantly in value, it could take years for you to get back to even. And, of course, there are no guarantees that it will come back during your investment lifetime. The less capital you have invested, the less you can benefit from the power of compounding growth.

If the compounding curve of your money is broken by market losses or premature withdrawals, it has a massive effect on your final pool of wealth. For example, if you were offered a job that lasted only 36 days and you had two choices on the pay plan, which one would you take? (A) You could be paid $5,000 per day at the end of every day, for a total of $180,000. (2) Your second option is to be paid one cent starting on Day One, but your pay would double each day — be compounded by 100 percent — and payable at the end of those 36 days.

If you jumped at the $180,000, you missed the power of true compounding of money. If your coworker doing the same job chose the compounding penny, he wouldn’t be a millionaire. After 36 days … he’d be a filthy rich multimillionaire with a final check of $343,597,384. Obviously, your investments won’t experience such rapid (or consistent) compound growth, but do the math —
the power of the compounding curve is strong over time — if you don’t break it with big losses (which you can’t always control) or withdrawals (which you can).

Money Lost in Fees and Interest to Banks and Financial Companies

The next massive wealth drains we face are interest and fees paid to banks or finance companies. Money-lending has been around for thousands of years, and any business model that’s lasted that long is a winner — for the business. But when you’re on the borrowing side of the transaction, it’s a wealth drain, especially if most of your borrowed money is spent on depreciating assets

Now, people will tell you that if you can borrow money cheap and invest it in something that has a higher rate of return than the interest rate you’re paying, then you’re using leverage properly. That can be true, but those attempting such a move should be aware of the caveats. Try this simple exercise: Add up all the money you’ve paid out over your lifetime in monthly payments. Then compare that total to the amount of money you have saved for retirement and see which one’s bigger. (If you’re willing, we’d love to hear about your results in the comments section below.) Then think about how to be a lender, and not a borrower.

Depreciation of Vehicles and Other Large Assets

Another massive wealth drain comes from the depreciation of cars, boats, equipment, appliances and most other large assets we buy. Most people will lose more money on cars during their lifetimes than they’ll ever save for retirement, let alone all the other depreciating assets they’ll buy. But there’s a way to make money on these items.

Think of your financial life as a big pie. Don’t fall for the old magic trick and focus only on what’s happening to your one slice of the pie (i.e., your investment gains or losses). Instead, pay attention to the whole pie and put a stop to your massive wealth drains.

 

 

2017, The Year to Shatter the Myths of Whole Life insurance

There are many myths about life insurance that most people unfortunately consider as facts. Most of these myths are perpetrated by Wall Street and people who want every nickel of your money in the market under their management. The first huge myth is “buy term and invest the difference” and this one is so big it required its own article to debunk.

Myth #2

Life insurance is a lousy place to put money

What I described in previous articles about designing policies is very true but there are also some other facts that blow this myth away. Simply ask yourself this question, if putting money into life insurance contracts is such a lousy place to put money, why do the biggest and most wealthy institutions put loads of their own money into life insurance products? Major Banks, large corporations, and family dynasties have been putting boat loads of money inside these kinds of policies for generations. Are they that stupid about money? Not hardly. They are very savvy with money which is why they use life insurance contracts and other products to grow and protect their wealth.

Major Banks High Cash Value Life Insurance
As of 12/31/2014, Federal Financial Institutions Examinations Council Call Reports

JPMorgan Chase 10.6 Billion Dollars
Wells Fargo Bank 17.995 Billion Dollars
Bank of America 20.794 Billion Dollars
PNC Bank 7.699 Billion Dollars

Whole life insurance is too expensive

When someone tells me that I will simply say “in relationship to what?” If you are just comparing it to premiums for a term policy on the same coverage amount you are correct. However, because of the tax free guaranteed compounding of a proper life policy many of my clients will overcome the actual cost of the insurance in the first few years of the policy. These policies will get to the point where they self complete which means the insurance company owes you more than you owe them in minimum premiums. So if you decided to, you could have the basic premium paid out of cash value and your cash value will still grow and move forward. So when 20 years from now you still want coverage and go to extend your old term insurance policy or buy another one, get ready for the shock of the new premium based on your attained age. If you had strongly funded a life policy 20 years before, that policy’s death benefit would have been growing these last 20 years (all part of proper design of the policy with a proper carrier) and no more funds would be required to maintain the policy due to the huge cash values you have accrued. You would have also have had access to large cash values to use for other wealth strategies.

Myth #4

Universal life or Indexed Universal life does the same thing as Whole Life

This is such a myth that I will need more than the space allotted to let you know how these policies really work over time and why the cost of insurance will skyrocket over the life of the policy. Please download my free report at my website and find the indexed universal life report under the video. Don’t you dare buy one of these policies until you read this free report. If you already have one of these policies get the report and be thankful there is probably something we can do for you to help. Ask us about a 1035 exchange of that kind of a policy to one that is better suited for long term and being your own bank.

Myth #5

I am too old or in too bad of health to obtain a life insurance policy

I have clients all over the country who once believed this to be true but now own life insurance policies. If you like the concepts of self banking and insurance policies don’t assume you can’t qualify for one of these policies. You may be able to qualify and the numbers will still make sense. If you indeed can’t qualify yourself there are other options.

Many of my clients take out policies on their children or grandchildren which mean the younger, healthier person qualifies for the insurance but my client owns the policy with all the benefits. I have clients in their 70’s who took out new policies but put the policy on their adult children. They then went on to use the funds in the policy as their own bank. Contact us to see if this might be an option for your situation as well.

When I am speaking to a crowd on this topic I often call a properly designed whole life policy as the “one account” because it is so truly unique and powerful. It is the only account that I am aware of that can function with many different uses that all work together. This is the only account that can be:

Savings Account– When you are not using your money it is sitting inside of the life insurance contract collecting much more in interest than it would if it was sitting in a bank. As of this writing most savings accounts are paying 0.5% or less and some life carriers dividend scale is almost 6.5% on life policies. Even after you take out the cost of insurance in the early years of the policy your money still does far better than dying a slow death in a traditional bank. You have easy access to your funds just like a savings account so why keep most of your money in the bank doing nothing for you or your family?

Your Personal Bank– Just as described in the last chapter you can put these funds to use to plug up your 4 massive wealth drains and help you grow wealth as the bank. Because you are doing this inside of your life insurance contract your earnings are tax deferred inside the policy and when properly done can be accessed tax free. Also with some policies and carriers the money you borrow out will still be credited with growth and dividends. This is not common but there are carriers that allow this and we can help you determining which carrier is best for your needs

Retirement Account- There will come a time when you desire to pull an income stream out of your policy. You will be able to either withdraw the money as you see fit (not optimal most of the time) or take policy loans that you will not pay back. In most cases policy loans are optimal because you don’t have to pay taxes on policy loans. If you choose, you don’t have to pay the policy loans back during your lifetime. The loans can be paid back out of the death benefit after you pass away. For instance you have a $1,000,000 death benefit but have borrowed out $250,000 in policy loans and deferred interest and you pass away, your family will receive the $1,000,000 death benefit less any outstanding policy loans which in this case are $250,000. This will produce $750,000 tax free to your estate after you pass away.

Rainy Day Fund- You should never borrow all the cash value out of your policy but rather keep a chunk of money in the policy in case of emergency. This is a rainy day fund that produces solid interest rates and return.

Estate Creator- Let’s not forget you are creating all this wealth inside of a life insurance contract which will automatically leave behind money for your family and/or anyone else you choose after you pass away. My mom, as she aged, started to worry more about leaving money behind for her family instead of living as abundant of a life as she should have lead. This is the only kind of program where you can spend every nickel during your lifetime and still leave behind extra for your family. Wherever you have your money saved or invested currently, ask yourself if the account you have it in has all of the benefits listed below. These are all benefits of a properly designed life insurance contract. Please feel free to contact us if you need more information.

How to Win the Financial Battle vs. Your Automobile

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A new car is one of the biggest wealth drains for you and your family. Use these two simple yet powerful tips to take control of this expensive item.

Think in the Long Term (for Models)

Buy the car you want — but only after it is at least two years old, and three would be better. By doing this, you automatically save hundreds of thousands of dollars over your lifetime.

When I was 23, I wanted to buy a nice four-door sedan, and I was drawn to the Cadillac STS. The new model had a base price of more $50,000, and with any kind of little extras the sticker was almost $55,000. I was doing very well at a young age, but I wasn’t doing that well to blow 50 grand on a new car.

I was thumbing through my local paper (yes, this was before the Internet changed everything) and saw an ad for a 2½ year old Cadillac STS for $19,500. The car had less than 40,000 miles on it and came with an extended warranty to 90,000 miles. It was gorgeous, shiny and just serviced.

It was an attractive price since the first owner was eating the depreciation.

According to www.Edmunds.com, the average car will lose 11 percent of its value the second you roll it off the lot and an additional 15 percent to 20 percent the first year you own it. The second-year depreciation (loss) is another 15 percent, for a loss of at least 45 percent over the first two years.

Depreciation is usually calculated off of the base price, not the extras. This could be the sport package that raises the price $10,000 but only gives you $2,000 back after the first year or two. So it’s quite possible to find beautiful cars with manufacturer warranties still in place and pay 35 percent to 50 percent less than the first owner did when purchased new.

I drove that car for four years, had very few out-of-pocket repairs, and sold it for $3,500.

So what kind of deal could you get today? When I was young, one of the dream cars was a Ferrari Testarossa, and its price was around $200,000. You can buy one now for around $50,000, and most don’t have that many miles on them because they’re babied by the owners.

Think in the Short Term (for Loans)

If you finance your auto purchase, you can save a lot of money by keeping the term to no more than 36 months. This builds equity in the car faster and saves on interest.

This might be difficult because the monthly payment is higher than if you finance over six years, and it’s higher than a monthly lease. If you finance $25,000 at 5 percent interest for three years, your monthly payment will be $749.27, and your total payout will be $26,974. If you extend that loan out to six years, your monthly payment drops to $402.62, but your total payout rises to $28,989. That’s $2,015 more out of your pocket to own the car.

Assuming you buy the car with a small down payment, by financing it for six years, your loan pay-down is going at a much slower pace than the depreciation on the vehicle, creating an “underwater” situation on the car almost from the get-go. During the three-year program, you’re paying down the car faster than it’s depreciating, giving you options if you have to sell the vehicle.

If you truly can’t afford that three-year payment, take out a five-year option and send a little extra every month toward the principal to pay it off sooner.

Leasing a newer model looks attractive because the monthly payment is less, but you might not want to do that. I’ll explain why next post, when I offer several other ways to save loads of money when purchasing an automobile.

Believe it or not you might be better off buying your own car rather than funding your 401k or IRA! Learn more at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjERU7KY16c

Indexed Universal Life – A Ticking Time Bomb!

How would you like to put money into a financial product that lets you benefit from market gains, but never feel the pain of its losses? The money and growth inside the policy will be 100 percent tax-free for life. That’s the seductive pitch often used to tout an investment called indexed universal life insurance.

Based on that sales pitch, it would be no wonder if your response were, “Sign me up for that right away!” Unfortunately, all that glitters is not gold. The sales materials for your IUL policy will almost always be illustrated with unrealistic compounded rates of return. But as we all know, stock market growth does not simply compound over time. Sure, you can measure an “average rate of return,” but in the real world, prices oscillate, and performance can be a creature of timing much more than investing.
Bomb
In fact, an indexed universal life insurance policy will almost always leave you holding the bag.

Let me clarify first that these are entirely different investments than the “properly designed whole life policies” that I wrote about in February. When you invest money inside an IUL policy, you’re setting up a life insurance policy with an annual renewable term cost of insurance. The extra money placed in the policy goes into sub accounts, and those funds will generally follow an index (or indices) in some form when that index increases in value. This structure will cause the cost of insurance to rise every year, which is why most people let these policies lapse in later years.

One Man’s $50,000 Premium

A retired neurosurgeon at one of my seminars told me about his IUL nightmare. He invested substantial money in an indexed universal life insurance policy when he was 49. He funded this policy for 20 years, and the projected profits never seem to materialize. Among the reasons why:

  • The projections that were illustrated for him were not realistic.
  • The expenses of the insurance and many other hidden fees come out daily.
  • The guaranteed growth of 3 percent was only payable at policy cancellation.

Much worse was the bill when he turned 70. This policy was structured with a 20-year guaranteed term policy for the death benefit, and his premium hit almost $50,000 — and not one nickel was going into any cash value.

Surely, something must be wrong, you say? He assumed it was clerical error until he called the carrier and was told that is how those types of policies are built. In the 21st year of the policy, the premium was supposed to be almost 100 times the first year’s premium, and it was only going to rise further, since term insurance gets more expensive as people age. This man closed the policy down, which meant he no longer would receive the death benefit, and even the pitiful gains his investment had realized were now taxable because he’d lost the umbrella of the insurance policy tax structure.

Lousy Ideas, Without Clear Numbers

Welcome to the wonderful world of indexed universal life insurance. I can’t wait to see in this articles comments that somehow, one of you knows about a “special product” that has a “no lapse” guarantee or some other new (and yet old) wrinkle that allegedly makes these lousy policies better. These dogs with fleas are generally sold to those with high incomes, such as doctors, as a way to put loads of money away in a tax-free environment instead of the limitations of an individual retirement account or 401(k). The illustrations are not realistic and fail to speak plain English as to what is going to happen with these policies.

If you have been sold one of these policies, examine the illustration you were shown and notice the cost of insurance cannibalizing the cash value in the later years of the policy. Study the cost of insurance, which will never be plainly spelled out in dollars and cents (your first clue something is amiss) but rather in decimal points. Watch how that number grows in the later years.

If you have the misfortune of having one of these policies, you might still have an option to roll into a 1035 tax-free exchange. It would allow you (assuming you qualify health-wise) to exchange your cash value in your IUL policy into a properly designed whole policy with solid guarantees and fixed costs all disclosed up front.

For more free training and information on this topic, watch our video of the week and get free downloads.

BYOB – Become Your Own Bank

Life is not just about knowledge but requires action as well. Please complete this life changing exercise before you read any further. Add up all the payments you have ever made in your life to a bank or finance company on every debt you have ever had during your life. This is on cars, real estate, business loans, business equipment, student loans, boats; anything motorized, etc. Now whatever that figure is for you (it will be largely a figure of age and income) double that number. So if your figure is $1,000,000 in total payments your number would be $2,000,000. Why do we double that figure? By giving up control of all your money in the form of monthly payments for all those years you turned over the growing power of that money to the bank. Depending on your age, even if you had kept that money and received even a modest interest rate of 4% to 6% your money would have easily doubled once and for many of you doubled a couple of times. Now that we have your “money lost” figure you need to add up your “money kept and invested”. To get that figure simply add up all the money you have saved up in your IRA’s, 401k and other retirement accounts. Grab your most recent statements and add them up quickly.

Calculator

This entire exercise can be done in 10 minutes and I challenge you to do it before you read one more word or at least immediately after you’re done. How much have you saved and invested for retirement? Now which of those two totals is bigger, the money paid to the bank figure or the money for your retirement figure?   Now ask yourself who is getting rich with that personal finance model. The answer is very apparent and that is the banks and Wall Street who love this business model. You borrow money your whole life and don’t care as long as the interest is low. This keeps you in financial bondage to the banks. Then whatever money you are able to put away is put inside of qualified plans and then given to Wall Street. Wall Street is flat out drunk with money and has been for many decades.

When I do this exercise in front of a room it produces laughter from the crowd because they are realizing that the monthly payments have deprived us of most of the wealth in our lives. My average participant might tell me $2,000,000 given in payments and lost growth and $70,000 saved for retirement.   Which figure would you prefer to have for yourself? This is math that any fifth grader can do and makes sense to anyone who has an open mind.

Now to be fair very few people could afford to self finance their first car or house so the numbers get skewed because you most likely would not have the option of self financing those early items. However, that is not an excuse for not moving toward that goal of being self financed. Think of your life as a giant income wheel. Income comes into the wheel and most of it gets spit right back out the other side of the wheel. Your goal is to keep as much money as possible coming in on the wheel for your accounts and to stop the 4 massive wealth drains we all have during our lives. Yes, there are more than 4 wealth drains but these 4 are the biggest and must be stopped so you can grow wealth regardless of what happens to any market. We will be discussing these wealth drains in depth in future articles.

It’s important to understand that I am not advocating just paying cash for items like many gurus incessantly preach.   I am talking about using your capital just like a major bank would use their capital. If you took out a loan from the bank would they be alright with you borrowing the money and not paying it back? Would they be happy with no interest paid to them? (Don’t get fooled by those 0% loan pitches because there is always a cost of money but sometimes it is hidden in the actual price and not the finance charges) The answer to both of those is, of course it wouldn’t be acceptable to not pay them back or not give them interest. Then it stands to reason that if you are acting as your own bank, why would it be acceptable to not pay yourself back or without interest? It is never acceptable just to pay cash (especially for anything over $10,000) and not pay the bank back even if you own the bank.

Guaranteed Income (Part 3)

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Last week, we talked about investing, the second circle of wealth in my series of “Six Absolute Necessities for Acquiring Long-Term Wealth.” The third is guaranteed income. When I study people with successful retirements, filled with abundance and options, almost all have things in common:

  • They carry very little, if any, personal debt.
  • They have stable, secure income from multiple sources that they can set their watch by every month
  • Starting about 10 years before they retire, they begin shifting their assets from riskier investments to low- or no-risk income assets.

A mortgage is generally the biggest debt most of us have. Many argue that you should never pay off your house because the equity you put into it is tied up and not making you money. They might recommend borrowing as much as you can now because interest rates are low.

I say you can have the best of both worlds. First, pay off your mortgage before you retire. By adding small amounts directed to your principle every month, you will take months, even years off your payoff date. When your house is paid off, get the biggest equity line of credit you can. This way, if you see an attractive investment opportunity, you can put your equity to use, and if you don’t, you have removed the pressure of a big mortgage payment in retirement.

If you can pay off your mortgage while you are working, why not now shift that payment over to a solid savings or income product? This could work out to tens of thousands of extra dollars producing monthly income for when you retire.

An abundant retirement is about strong positive cash flow that you can count on for years to come. Do you have any idea how much money you need to retire every month? Do you know where you can get that income from? Do you have enough money for home health care or long-term care? Are you protected from big market downturns during your retirement years? How much will inflation eat into that monthly income needed?

Can You Answer These Questions?question mark

All these questions must be part of an income plan. We calculate these for clients all over the country. First, know how much income you and your spouse will receive from Social Security when you retire. You can get an estimate from the Social Security Administration. If you believe that number is at risk because of issues with Social Security, you better start putting more away and growing it safely.

If you need $5,000 per month to retire and the Social Security for you and your spouse is only $3,500, then you have a $1,500 shortfall. Do you have a pension? How much will that be when you begin to draw it? Do you have a 401(k) or Individual Retirement Account? How long could that account last if you need to draw $1,500 a month — $18,000 in a year? Will you have to pay taxes on what you take out? If you have a 401(k) or traditional IRA, the answer is yes. If you lose 50 percent of your capital to a bear market, how long will you be able to get $18,000 per year?

As you get to be in what we call the “retirement danger zone,” which is 10 years before your projected retirement, you need to start shifting assets away from market risk and over to guaranteed products. A solid fixed indexed annuity with a long-term income rider might be a very good call. I wrote an article about the different types of annuities and how to purchase one that fits your needs.

A lifetime income rider (state and product variations exist) will guarantee that you have a certain amount of income (depending on how much you have in your annuity and at what age you start withdrawing) for you and your spouse’s life. If you live to be very old, your normal retirement funds might run out, but a lifetime income rider guarantees that income stream regardless of what happens to the underlying cash in the account. Also if you have five to 10 years, you have time for that income rider to grow. Many income riders offer 6 percent and more guaranteed growth every year.

When you purchase a $200,000 annuity, many companies might offer a 10 percent bonus on your initial purchase price so your starting amount would be $220,000. When you add compound growth at 6 percent over 10 years, your income rider would top $400,000. Then you would start to draw your lifetime income at 6 percent of the $400,000, giving you $24,000 a year income for you and your spouse’s life. Presto! You have filled your income gap. If you have the resources to purchase another annuity, you might get one with a cost of living clause to hedge against inflation.

John Jamieson is the best-selling author of “The Perpetual Wealth System.” Check out this week’s featured video.

Wealth Without Stocks! Why haven’t I heard of this before?

The indoctrination of the stock market is most powerful

Turn on your television, your phone, your computer, and any other device you care to name and you will almost certainly be greeted by the day’s stock averages such as the Dow Jones, NASDAQ, and S&P 500, among others. You will be instantly updated as to the direction of the market. There are entire television channels that are on 24 hours a day and 7 days a week that do nothing but report on the stock market; such as CNBC. How boring to have to follow those for hours every day.

When that kind of media blitz has been happening now for generations it is small wonder why people are unaware that they can, in fact, create much wealth even without stocks or mutual funds. This philosophy is NOT about being anti-stock market; there is certainly a place in every wealth plan for stocks or funds somewhere along an individual’s stages of wealth. The problem is that the vast majority of people have no idea of the many other ways that are available to grow and protect wealth. When me or my teammates and staff work with our clients from all over the country they are always fascinated when we start to discuss many of the alternative options to grow and protect wealth.

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Most of the topics we will cover in future posts are not only virtually unknown to most of the world but when used properly they can be extremely powerful. I am so excited to put all these wealth vehicles in one place that I can’t wait to begin to put this powerful information in your hands. We are going to cover debt reduction strategies, creative real estate strategies, private pension and self-directed IRA strategies, just to name a few.

We talked earlier a little bit about why the stock market is such a major force in almost every investor’s life but there is also the fact that you don’t need any knowledge to put your money into the market. Most Americans simply select what kind of investor they are; which will include aggressive, moderate, and conservative (Translation is how much money you can afford to lose). Just like that, they are signed up for their employers 401k, which will be their main retirement savings and investing plan for the rest of their lives. More than 80% admit to really having no clue what they signed up for to any great degree and certainly no knowledge of how their money was being invested. They just get their investing amount taken out of every check and let it ride!

The good news with that philosophy is that you don’t need any extra knowledge; the bad news is that you are making one of the biggest financial decisions in your life blind. You are investing (not saving, in most cases) money and just blowing all of your income. Although this is far from perfect, it is better than not doing anything at all. It’s fast, easy, and painless to get started funding your future. So you don’t have to be a financial expert to begin to accumulate wealth. That system is hands off from you and will allow you to focus on other things that are important in your life. The money is given to Wall Street (most of the time) and invested through mutual funds into many different kinds of stocks. However, that system also comes with enormous costs in the form of market losses and huge opportunity costs that we will talk about more in an upcoming articles.

The wealth without stocks philosophy is not that simple (it is pretty easy but not that simple) and will require you to obtain some niche knowledge to take advantage of the markets that are available to you in your quest to build wealth. If you are reading this than I am going to assume that you are the kind of person who is willing to shut off the television to further their own education for even one hour per night. You are willing to sacrifice time on Facebook® and every other social media time suck that are available to us. If that is a true statement than you will have the opportunity to grow and protect wealth at an accelerated rate that should far outpace your colleagues who have bought into the old financial plan described earlier. I want to congratulate you for being one of the few that actually will take the time to design their finances and secure an abundant future.

You are about to be launched into a secretive world (in comparison to the stock market and mutual fund world) that will make simple sense to you. Think of these articles like your own personal wealth buffet and you are free to choose whatever is to your liking and leave the other strategies on the table untouched. However, what will happen for many of you is that you will implement one of two of the strategies and then come back to the well of knowledge to see what else might be a fit for your goals. Just because it is not a fit for you today doesn’t mean it won’t be a fit for you tomorrow.

Just be open-minded and ready to learn!

All the best to you,
John Jamieson