2017, The Year to Shatter the Myths of Whole Life insurance

There are many myths about life insurance that most people unfortunately consider as facts. Most of these myths are perpetrated by Wall Street and people who want every nickel of your money in the market under their management. The first huge myth is “buy term and invest the difference” and this one is so big it required its own article to debunk.

Myth #2

Life insurance is a lousy place to put money

What I described in previous articles about designing policies is very true but there are also some other facts that blow this myth away. Simply ask yourself this question, if putting money into life insurance contracts is such a lousy place to put money, why do the biggest and most wealthy institutions put loads of their own money into life insurance products? Major Banks, large corporations, and family dynasties have been putting boat loads of money inside these kinds of policies for generations. Are they that stupid about money? Not hardly. They are very savvy with money which is why they use life insurance contracts and other products to grow and protect their wealth.

Major Banks High Cash Value Life Insurance
As of 12/31/2014, Federal Financial Institutions Examinations Council Call Reports

JPMorgan Chase 10.6 Billion Dollars
Wells Fargo Bank 17.995 Billion Dollars
Bank of America 20.794 Billion Dollars
PNC Bank 7.699 Billion Dollars

Whole life insurance is too expensive

When someone tells me that I will simply say “in relationship to what?” If you are just comparing it to premiums for a term policy on the same coverage amount you are correct. However, because of the tax free guaranteed compounding of a proper life policy many of my clients will overcome the actual cost of the insurance in the first few years of the policy. These policies will get to the point where they self complete which means the insurance company owes you more than you owe them in minimum premiums. So if you decided to, you could have the basic premium paid out of cash value and your cash value will still grow and move forward. So when 20 years from now you still want coverage and go to extend your old term insurance policy or buy another one, get ready for the shock of the new premium based on your attained age. If you had strongly funded a life policy 20 years before, that policy’s death benefit would have been growing these last 20 years (all part of proper design of the policy with a proper carrier) and no more funds would be required to maintain the policy due to the huge cash values you have accrued. You would have also have had access to large cash values to use for other wealth strategies.

Myth #4

Universal life or Indexed Universal life does the same thing as Whole Life

This is such a myth that I will need more than the space allotted to let you know how these policies really work over time and why the cost of insurance will skyrocket over the life of the policy. Please download my free report at my website and find the indexed universal life report under the video. Don’t you dare buy one of these policies until you read this free report. If you already have one of these policies get the report and be thankful there is probably something we can do for you to help. Ask us about a 1035 exchange of that kind of a policy to one that is better suited for long term and being your own bank.

Myth #5

I am too old or in too bad of health to obtain a life insurance policy

I have clients all over the country who once believed this to be true but now own life insurance policies. If you like the concepts of self banking and insurance policies don’t assume you can’t qualify for one of these policies. You may be able to qualify and the numbers will still make sense. If you indeed can’t qualify yourself there are other options.

Many of my clients take out policies on their children or grandchildren which mean the younger, healthier person qualifies for the insurance but my client owns the policy with all the benefits. I have clients in their 70’s who took out new policies but put the policy on their adult children. They then went on to use the funds in the policy as their own bank. Contact us to see if this might be an option for your situation as well.

When I am speaking to a crowd on this topic I often call a properly designed whole life policy as the “one account” because it is so truly unique and powerful. It is the only account that I am aware of that can function with many different uses that all work together. This is the only account that can be:

Savings Account– When you are not using your money it is sitting inside of the life insurance contract collecting much more in interest than it would if it was sitting in a bank. As of this writing most savings accounts are paying 0.5% or less and some life carriers dividend scale is almost 6.5% on life policies. Even after you take out the cost of insurance in the early years of the policy your money still does far better than dying a slow death in a traditional bank. You have easy access to your funds just like a savings account so why keep most of your money in the bank doing nothing for you or your family?

Your Personal Bank– Just as described in the last chapter you can put these funds to use to plug up your 4 massive wealth drains and help you grow wealth as the bank. Because you are doing this inside of your life insurance contract your earnings are tax deferred inside the policy and when properly done can be accessed tax free. Also with some policies and carriers the money you borrow out will still be credited with growth and dividends. This is not common but there are carriers that allow this and we can help you determining which carrier is best for your needs

Retirement Account- There will come a time when you desire to pull an income stream out of your policy. You will be able to either withdraw the money as you see fit (not optimal most of the time) or take policy loans that you will not pay back. In most cases policy loans are optimal because you don’t have to pay taxes on policy loans. If you choose, you don’t have to pay the policy loans back during your lifetime. The loans can be paid back out of the death benefit after you pass away. For instance you have a $1,000,000 death benefit but have borrowed out $250,000 in policy loans and deferred interest and you pass away, your family will receive the $1,000,000 death benefit less any outstanding policy loans which in this case are $250,000. This will produce $750,000 tax free to your estate after you pass away.

Rainy Day Fund- You should never borrow all the cash value out of your policy but rather keep a chunk of money in the policy in case of emergency. This is a rainy day fund that produces solid interest rates and return.

Estate Creator- Let’s not forget you are creating all this wealth inside of a life insurance contract which will automatically leave behind money for your family and/or anyone else you choose after you pass away. My mom, as she aged, started to worry more about leaving money behind for her family instead of living as abundant of a life as she should have lead. This is the only kind of program where you can spend every nickel during your lifetime and still leave behind extra for your family. Wherever you have your money saved or invested currently, ask yourself if the account you have it in has all of the benefits listed below. These are all benefits of a properly designed life insurance contract. Please feel free to contact us if you need more information.

Free Webinar – Banking and Life Insurance

Please join us on Thursday, May 28th 2015 for an absolutely FREE Personal Banking and Life Insurance Webinar hosted by #1 Best Selling Author, John Jamieson

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Ask yourself this question; How much money would you have today if you had back every payment you had ever made on anything in your life? Every car, house, credit card, student, business loan, and any other debt in your life, you would have today. Not only would you have all those payments back but they would have been growing for years, tax-free, at a strong rate of return and you had access to the money any time for any reason without penalty.

You see, the average American family spends approximately 40% of their income on outgoing payments. We pay that money to banks and finance companies for the use of their money; in the form of principal and interest. Meanwhile we are told to invest 10% of our income into 401ks, IRAs, and other similar investment vehicles and hope the stock market goes up so maybe one day we can retire. Yet, as of December 2014 the US National Average Savings Rate was just 4.3%.

What if you were the bank and could pick up all those payments for yourself and your family? Would you be much wealthier than you are now? The answer for all of us is a big YES! If that interests you and would like to know more, join us on the webinar to get more details. You have the ability to start your own finance company and build wealth rapidly and safely.

Banking and Life Insurance Webinar is May 28,2015 at 8:00 pm EDT. This is free to join, please share this with others you know that would benefit from the great information being shared by John Jamieson. Don’t forget to register and put the date/time on your calendar!

Indexed Universal Life – A Ticking Time Bomb!

How would you like to put money into a financial product that lets you benefit from market gains, but never feel the pain of its losses? The money and growth inside the policy will be 100 percent tax-free for life. That’s the seductive pitch often used to tout an investment called indexed universal life insurance.

Based on that sales pitch, it would be no wonder if your response were, “Sign me up for that right away!” Unfortunately, all that glitters is not gold. The sales materials for your IUL policy will almost always be illustrated with unrealistic compounded rates of return. But as we all know, stock market growth does not simply compound over time. Sure, you can measure an “average rate of return,” but in the real world, prices oscillate, and performance can be a creature of timing much more than investing.
Bomb
In fact, an indexed universal life insurance policy will almost always leave you holding the bag.

Let me clarify first that these are entirely different investments than the “properly designed whole life policies” that I wrote about in February. When you invest money inside an IUL policy, you’re setting up a life insurance policy with an annual renewable term cost of insurance. The extra money placed in the policy goes into sub accounts, and those funds will generally follow an index (or indices) in some form when that index increases in value. This structure will cause the cost of insurance to rise every year, which is why most people let these policies lapse in later years.

One Man’s $50,000 Premium

A retired neurosurgeon at one of my seminars told me about his IUL nightmare. He invested substantial money in an indexed universal life insurance policy when he was 49. He funded this policy for 20 years, and the projected profits never seem to materialize. Among the reasons why:

  • The projections that were illustrated for him were not realistic.
  • The expenses of the insurance and many other hidden fees come out daily.
  • The guaranteed growth of 3 percent was only payable at policy cancellation.

Much worse was the bill when he turned 70. This policy was structured with a 20-year guaranteed term policy for the death benefit, and his premium hit almost $50,000 — and not one nickel was going into any cash value.

Surely, something must be wrong, you say? He assumed it was clerical error until he called the carrier and was told that is how those types of policies are built. In the 21st year of the policy, the premium was supposed to be almost 100 times the first year’s premium, and it was only going to rise further, since term insurance gets more expensive as people age. This man closed the policy down, which meant he no longer would receive the death benefit, and even the pitiful gains his investment had realized were now taxable because he’d lost the umbrella of the insurance policy tax structure.

Lousy Ideas, Without Clear Numbers

Welcome to the wonderful world of indexed universal life insurance. I can’t wait to see in this articles comments that somehow, one of you knows about a “special product” that has a “no lapse” guarantee or some other new (and yet old) wrinkle that allegedly makes these lousy policies better. These dogs with fleas are generally sold to those with high incomes, such as doctors, as a way to put loads of money away in a tax-free environment instead of the limitations of an individual retirement account or 401(k). The illustrations are not realistic and fail to speak plain English as to what is going to happen with these policies.

If you have been sold one of these policies, examine the illustration you were shown and notice the cost of insurance cannibalizing the cash value in the later years of the policy. Study the cost of insurance, which will never be plainly spelled out in dollars and cents (your first clue something is amiss) but rather in decimal points. Watch how that number grows in the later years.

If you have the misfortune of having one of these policies, you might still have an option to roll into a 1035 tax-free exchange. It would allow you (assuming you qualify health-wise) to exchange your cash value in your IUL policy into a properly designed whole policy with solid guarantees and fixed costs all disclosed up front.

For more free training and information on this topic, watch our video of the week and get free downloads.

Do you review your beneficiary forms?

The importance of an annual review of your beneficiary forms on your different accounts and/or policies is often overlooked. Think of your smoke alarm; most people have an annual schedule to change their battery. Your beneficiary forms on your IRA, 401k, annuity or life insurance policies, etc… are important too and should be added to your schedule. At a minimum they should be reviewed by you annually and/or after a life-changing event such as death of a loved one, divorce Calendar 300x301or birth of a child.

Just think how upset you would be if the government took more taxes on your monies because you didn’t name the beneficiary correctly on one of your accounts. Maybe you forgot to change the beneficiary from your ex-spouse to your new spouse on your life insurance policy. Or you just named your estate as the beneficiary and therefore your estate goes to Probate Court. The probate process could take a year or more to get finalized; delaying your beneficiaries from getting the monies. This could have large ramifications for your loved one’s after you have passed away when you wanted to bring them peace of mind.

Did you know that your beneficiary form will override your will on your IRA accounts? Say you remembered to update your will after you remarried but didn’t update your beneficiary form on your IRA account. This means the monies in that account might not be going to the person or persons you wanted.

There could be tax ramifications for those named as your beneficiary on your different accounts and/or policies. For example; naming a person or trust as a beneficiary will usually help those monies avoid going to probate court. This could also keep the monies away from your estate and available to creditors. We recommend you speak with your tax advisor to determine the best way to list your beneficiary to avoid the common pitfalls that beneficiaries deal with after the death of their loved one.