What is a Restricted Property Trust?

Big Tax Deductions and a Secure Retirement for Business Owners using a Restricted Property Trust

How successful business owners are putting more money away for Retirement than they ever could with a Traditional Retirement Account

Trusts as a wealth building and wealth preservation tool have been around for centuries.  Every specific trust has a specific purpose for why it is set up and how it is utilized.  There is one that is designed for high income business owners to be able to put away more money for retirement than they possibly could with a traditional retirement plan.  This trust will also allow the business owner to do this on a tax deductible basis.

This also allows the business owner to legally “discriminate” against their current employees or co owners so if they choose; the owner can be the only one who participates in the plan.  This is very different from traditional retirement accounts where most full time employees must be given the opportunity to participate in the retirement plan.

The name of this trust is a “Restricted Property Trust” and is a very powerful tool for the right business owner.  It basically works like this:

  • A successful business owner is allowed to fund from $50,000 (minimum) to millions of dollars per year for at least 5 years into a restricted property trust. We will use $100,000 contributions for our examples
  • Most of this contribution will be tax deductible to the business owner because of the nature of the Restricted Property Trust
  • That contribution will be used to fund a Whole life insurance policy creating cash value and an instant death benefit for the business owner’s estate. If the business owner should die during the initial 5 year period (or subsequent 5 year blocks of time in which the trust operates 10,15, or 20 years) the death benefit finishes off the funding of the trust commitment and the balance of the death benefit  goes to the business owners family
  • The business owner makes a firm commitment to fund the trust for those 5 years with $100,000 per year and if the business owner fails to make that contribution they forfeit all previous contributions to a charity. This creates a chance of loss necessary to make most of these contributions tax deductible.  Needless to say the business owner who sets this up is confident in their income for the trust period and/or they have significant assets in other places they could easily draw on to make these contributions.
  • Depending on the situation about $70,000 of the $100,000 contribution will be tax deductible every year the contribution is made into the trust. Over 10 years this would create $700,000 worth of tax deductions directly off of your businesses income putting hundreds of thousands of dollars in your bank account (depending on your effective tax rate)
  • Also at the end of the 10 years (in this example) you will have more money in your plan in the form of cash value than you put into the plan. Let’s assume you have put in $1,000,000 into the plan over 10 years, you now might have $1,200,000 in cash value inside the plan and the life insurance policy.  The trust is dissolved and you now own the life policy personally along with all the cash and death benefit.  You have also pocketed hundreds of thousands in dollars of cash that you would have paid to Uncle Sam without this unique and powerful structure.

There are some taxes to be paid out of the cash value at the end but the balance of the cash value is all tax free and can be an entirely new tax free income stream for the business owner.

This is not simply a deferred comp plan or is it a traditional retirement account.  It is much more high level than either one of those programs.  Now let’s answer some of the most common questions we receive about this program.

Q: I already have other retirement accounts I am funding, can I still fund this trust in addition to my other accounts?

A: Yes you can.

Q: Can I be a partial owner of my business with partners?  If yes, do my partners have to participate in the program as well?

A: Yes you can be a partial owner of the business and no your partners don’t have to agree to the plan (but don’t be surprised if they want to set this up for themselves as well) and your employees do not share in this benefit at all

Q: How much money do I have to make to be able to qualify for this trust?

A: There is not a specific income level but the minimum contribution to the trust is $50,000 annually for 5 year increments.

Q: if I have the resources can I put in $300,000 or even more a year into the program?

A: Yes, but that contribution amount will be dictated by how much your business is worth and how much of a death benefit the business owner can qualify for based on that business value.

Q: What happens if I can’t make the contribution during that 5 year term?

A: You contributions will be forfeited to a qualified charity

Q:  Why is life insurance a part of this plan?

A: For various tax and trust reasons a properly structured whole life policy is a must for this program to be implemented

Q: If I should die during one of the 5 year trust periods, who gets the death benefit from the life insurance policy?

A: Your estate collects the death benefit during the trust periods and after the trust periods when you take control of the policy after the trust is dissolved

Q: Can I have access to the cash value in the life policy during the trust period?

A: No there is no access to the cash value during the trust period.

Q: I am a salaried employee who makes big income but am issued just a W2 at the end of the year.  Do I qualify to participate in this program?

A: Unfortunately this type of trust is just for business owners or partial business owners.  It is possible to receive a W2 as a salary and own the business as well.  You must own a part of the business to be eligible to participate in this plan.

Q: Because life insurance is included in this plan do I have to qualify physically as well as financially for this program?

A: Yes there will be a physical required to qualify for the underlying life insurance policy.  Most people who use this program are in their 50’s or 60’s and the vast majority get approved physically for the policy.

In closing, a restricted property trust can be a great benefit for the right established business owner with disposable income and/or other assets they can draw upon to fund the trust.  It is not meant for spotty incomes or low asset business owners.  If the business owner is stable and confident in their ability to fund the trust during the trust periods it can be a great tool.

If you would like more information on this program, please visit www.perpetualinsurance.com for a brief presentation and the information on how you can set up a personal consultation to see if this is a fit for your business.

 

“Investment Grade” Life Insurance and What You Need to Know

I was staunchly opposed to whole life insurance because that’s what I was taught by national “gurus” 25 years ago. I wholeheartedly believed (as
many people still do) that if you need life insurance, you should buy a term policy, then take the difference in premiums between whole life and term and invest it in mutual funds.

So when a good friend of mine sat me down several years ago and tried to show me a whole life insurance plan, I nearly refused to listen. Many of you reading this will feel the same way, and nothing I say will change your minds. That’s fine — you’re entitled to your opinion just as I was entitled to mine.

Thankfully, my friend told me about “Investment Grade” life insurance. I soon realized that the gurus in my early years and the gurus of today were correct — based on the information they’d been given. The problem was their information was incomplete.

Whenever I hear a financial consultant (or anyone, for that matter) talk about less expensive premiums for term, I know they really don’t understand how this animal of properly designed “Investment Grade” whole life insurance really works.

With a properly designed whole life insurance policy, you get:

1. Principal protection guarantees of your money. Your cash value isn’t subject to market losses, as it is with mutual funds and other programs. When the stock market tanks again (and it’s never a question of if but when), you won’t lose a dime.

2. Guaranteed growth of your money every year. This will be interest-rate-driven based on the economy, but your account will move forward every year regardless of what the market does. This is compound tax-free growth and not the “average rate of return” you get with mutual funds. To be fair, in our current low-interest-rate environment, the growth rates are only in the 2 percent to 4 percent range but as you study further you start to realize the real wealth is not in the growth rate even when rates go higher.

Many financial advisers will tell you that your money would do better in a good mutual fund. But remember: When someone shows you an “average rate of return,” they can start taking that average from any time that benefits their example. This is not compounded growth but rather a factor of timing as to when you enter and exit the market. The stock market has wild swings; if that is acceptable to you, you should have much of your money in stocks. If not, maybe it’s time to consider a different way to think about investing. (Remember the period from March 2000 to October 2002, when the Nasdaq lost 78 percent of its value? It’s been 16 years since the dot-com bubble started to pop, and the tech-heavy index still hasn’t quite recovered to that level. If you like guarantees and stability then you have no business putting most of your money in the stock market.)

3. Dividends paid to policy owners are not taxable. Dividends aren’t guaranteed, but many reputable life insurance companies have been in business for more than 100 years and they’ve paid out dividends every year. The amount of that dividend will depend on several factors, but it boils down to how much profit the insurance carrier made. When properly paid to the policy owner, those dividends are not taxable.

4. A high starting cash value amount, based on what you contribute to the policy. Whole life policies that aren’t properly designed will have very little cash value in the early years.

But a properly structured life insurance policy will have high cash value percentages, even in its first year, and they increase every year. This becomes an important fact when you realize that access to your cash will help you grow wealth systematically regardless of market conditions

5. Access to your cash value at any age, at any time, for any reason — without taxes or penalty. This is a huge benefit of whole life policies compared to 401(k)s and IRAs, which impose multiple obstacles if you want to access your cash before retirement, and penalize you if the funds you borrow from them are not paid back by a certain time and at a certain interest rate. No such obstacles exist with a whole-life policy. So leave your cash in the policy if you wish, or borrow it back out and use it, the choice is yours.

6. The ability to use your account’s cash value to recapture lost depreciation on major purchases and interest and fees paid to banks. If you treat this pool of money inside the life policy like your own personal bank, you can loan it out to yourself and others to create wealth. (More on this in future articles, but suffice it to say for now that banking has been around in some fashion for thousands of years. Any business model that lasts that long is worth understanding and using to your advantage.)

7. Guaranteed insurance. Once the policy is in place, your insurance is guaranteed for the rest of your life. Many people assume they’ll be able to buy new insurance at any point in their life. But nothing is further from the truth — especially for those who’ve been diagnosed with chronic or terminal diseases. If you become seriously ill, don’t expect to be able to buy a new policy.

With many whole-life policies, you can add an “accelerated death benefit rider” for little to no cost, which will give you access to a large portion of your death benefit during your lifetime if you have a terminal or chronic illness. I just had a colleague with a client who was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease, or ALS, and was sent a check from his insurer for more than 70 percent of the eventual death benefit. He’ll be able to enjoy his remaining time without worrying how he will pay his bills.

8. The ability to combine your life policy with the worlds of real estate, private lending and auto financing to accelerate your wealth, both inside and outside of the policy. Just remember that any funds inside the policy are tax-free for life.

9. Protection from long term care and chronic care expenses. Well written policies with the proper companies could provide the ability access a portion of your eventual death benefit during your lifetime to help pay for assisted living or long term care expenses. This will insulate and protect your other wealth so you don’t spend a lifetime building wealth only to give it all back before you pass away leaving nothing for your family.

10. Death benefit. In addition to all the benefits you can make use of while you’re still here, at heart, this investment is still a life insurance policy, so when you eventually die, there will be a sum of money left behind to your beneficiaries — tax-free.

There’s a reason family dynasties, banks, and big corporations have been using life insurance for generations to grow and protect their wealth. Even when subject to estate limits, these death payouts go a long way toward promoting the tax-free, inter-generational transfer of wealth.

Of course, insurance company policies and riders will vary by state due to state regulations and depending on the actual insurance carrier. But you won’t find another type of account or investment that has all these benefits in one investment — not 401(k)s, IRAs, mutual funds, stocks, bonds, precious metals, real estate, nor any other account.

To engage with me further on this kind of policy, please email me directly at john@wealthwithoutstocks.com and visit our site at www.wealthwithoutstocks.com for many free videos, articles, archived interviews and more!

2017, The Year to Shatter the Myths of Whole Life insurance

There are many myths about life insurance that most people unfortunately consider as facts. Most of these myths are perpetrated by Wall Street and people who want every nickel of your money in the market under their management. The first huge myth is “buy term and invest the difference” and this one is so big it required its own article to debunk.

Myth #2

Life insurance is a lousy place to put money

What I described in previous articles about designing policies is very true but there are also some other facts that blow this myth away. Simply ask yourself this question, if putting money into life insurance contracts is such a lousy place to put money, why do the biggest and most wealthy institutions put loads of their own money into life insurance products? Major Banks, large corporations, and family dynasties have been putting boat loads of money inside these kinds of policies for generations. Are they that stupid about money? Not hardly. They are very savvy with money which is why they use life insurance contracts and other products to grow and protect their wealth.

Major Banks High Cash Value Life Insurance
As of 12/31/2014, Federal Financial Institutions Examinations Council Call Reports

JPMorgan Chase 10.6 Billion Dollars
Wells Fargo Bank 17.995 Billion Dollars
Bank of America 20.794 Billion Dollars
PNC Bank 7.699 Billion Dollars

Whole life insurance is too expensive

When someone tells me that I will simply say “in relationship to what?” If you are just comparing it to premiums for a term policy on the same coverage amount you are correct. However, because of the tax free guaranteed compounding of a proper life policy many of my clients will overcome the actual cost of the insurance in the first few years of the policy. These policies will get to the point where they self complete which means the insurance company owes you more than you owe them in minimum premiums. So if you decided to, you could have the basic premium paid out of cash value and your cash value will still grow and move forward. So when 20 years from now you still want coverage and go to extend your old term insurance policy or buy another one, get ready for the shock of the new premium based on your attained age. If you had strongly funded a life policy 20 years before, that policy’s death benefit would have been growing these last 20 years (all part of proper design of the policy with a proper carrier) and no more funds would be required to maintain the policy due to the huge cash values you have accrued. You would have also have had access to large cash values to use for other wealth strategies.

Myth #4

Universal life or Indexed Universal life does the same thing as Whole Life

This is such a myth that I will need more than the space allotted to let you know how these policies really work over time and why the cost of insurance will skyrocket over the life of the policy. Please download my free report at my website and find the indexed universal life report under the video. Don’t you dare buy one of these policies until you read this free report. If you already have one of these policies get the report and be thankful there is probably something we can do for you to help. Ask us about a 1035 exchange of that kind of a policy to one that is better suited for long term and being your own bank.

Myth #5

I am too old or in too bad of health to obtain a life insurance policy

I have clients all over the country who once believed this to be true but now own life insurance policies. If you like the concepts of self banking and insurance policies don’t assume you can’t qualify for one of these policies. You may be able to qualify and the numbers will still make sense. If you indeed can’t qualify yourself there are other options.

Many of my clients take out policies on their children or grandchildren which mean the younger, healthier person qualifies for the insurance but my client owns the policy with all the benefits. I have clients in their 70’s who took out new policies but put the policy on their adult children. They then went on to use the funds in the policy as their own bank. Contact us to see if this might be an option for your situation as well.

When I am speaking to a crowd on this topic I often call a properly designed whole life policy as the “one account” because it is so truly unique and powerful. It is the only account that I am aware of that can function with many different uses that all work together. This is the only account that can be:

Savings Account– When you are not using your money it is sitting inside of the life insurance contract collecting much more in interest than it would if it was sitting in a bank. As of this writing most savings accounts are paying 0.5% or less and some life carriers dividend scale is almost 6.5% on life policies. Even after you take out the cost of insurance in the early years of the policy your money still does far better than dying a slow death in a traditional bank. You have easy access to your funds just like a savings account so why keep most of your money in the bank doing nothing for you or your family?

Your Personal Bank– Just as described in the last chapter you can put these funds to use to plug up your 4 massive wealth drains and help you grow wealth as the bank. Because you are doing this inside of your life insurance contract your earnings are tax deferred inside the policy and when properly done can be accessed tax free. Also with some policies and carriers the money you borrow out will still be credited with growth and dividends. This is not common but there are carriers that allow this and we can help you determining which carrier is best for your needs

Retirement Account- There will come a time when you desire to pull an income stream out of your policy. You will be able to either withdraw the money as you see fit (not optimal most of the time) or take policy loans that you will not pay back. In most cases policy loans are optimal because you don’t have to pay taxes on policy loans. If you choose, you don’t have to pay the policy loans back during your lifetime. The loans can be paid back out of the death benefit after you pass away. For instance you have a $1,000,000 death benefit but have borrowed out $250,000 in policy loans and deferred interest and you pass away, your family will receive the $1,000,000 death benefit less any outstanding policy loans which in this case are $250,000. This will produce $750,000 tax free to your estate after you pass away.

Rainy Day Fund- You should never borrow all the cash value out of your policy but rather keep a chunk of money in the policy in case of emergency. This is a rainy day fund that produces solid interest rates and return.

Estate Creator- Let’s not forget you are creating all this wealth inside of a life insurance contract which will automatically leave behind money for your family and/or anyone else you choose after you pass away. My mom, as she aged, started to worry more about leaving money behind for her family instead of living as abundant of a life as she should have lead. This is the only kind of program where you can spend every nickel during your lifetime and still leave behind extra for your family. Wherever you have your money saved or invested currently, ask yourself if the account you have it in has all of the benefits listed below. These are all benefits of a properly designed life insurance contract. Please feel free to contact us if you need more information.